Resources

We do our research. As community organizers our goal is to develop grassroots solutions to transform our schools and communities. That’s why with the help of our trained parent and student leaders, we conduct our own community assessments. We develop surveys, conduct observations and interview critical stakeholders to find the best policy solutions. Learn more about the most pressing policy issues and solutions concerning Eastside residents.

Health Justice for Eastside Students: Strengthening Access to Health and Wellness for Academic Access

By InnerCity Struggle | 2013

In this report, InnerCity Struggle parents and students conducted direct observations and interviews to assess the needs to improve comprehensive wellness services for students at Esteban E. Torres High School. We present key findings regarding the services provided at the Wellness Center, and call on all stakeholders to support the center with immediate and concrete solutions.

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Food Justice for Eastside Schools

By InnerCity Struggle | 2012

InnerCity Struggle’s youth component United Students conducted an analysis to determine the needs for “food justice” at five Eastside schools: Roosevelt, Garfield, Torres, Wilson and Lincoln. In this policy report, we focused on three major areas: access to food, food quality and time. We present three urgent policy recommendations for immediately improving student access and quality of food in Eastside high schools.

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The Movement Continues: The State of Equity and Access in Eastside Public Schools

By InnerCity Struggle | June 2010

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Building off of our successful 2007 report that highlighted a student and parent vision and in which we surveyed over 6,000 residents, our parents and students went a step further in 2010 and surveyed more than 8,000 residents to more closely examine the role of A-G course requirements in ensuring graduation and college readiness. In this study, we discuss the role teachers, counselors, access to equitable resources, and family engagement all play in preparing all students to be college ready.

A Student and Parent Vision for Educational Justice in the Eastside

By InnerCity Struggle | June 2007

English

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In this study conducted by parents and student leaders of InnerCity Struggle, we surveyed more than 6,000 Eastside residents to identify the best policy solutions that could transform public education in the Eastside. We review the most pressing concerns impacting student achievement, and present a call to action for all Eastside stakeholders.

Frustrated by 80 Years of Neglect, Students and Parents Ignite a Fight for a New High School in East L.A.

By Maria Brenes | Spring 2005

In this publication, Executive Director of InnerCity Struggle Maria Brenes tells the story of how parents and students united in 2003 to demand the construction of new schools, in order to relieve the massive overcrowding and inequitable facilities in Eastside public schools. 

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The Schools We Deserve

By Families in Schools with Communities for Educational Equity | Spring 2005

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A parent resource guide to prepare families on how to best support their child’s path to attend a four-year university. We debunk the myths about student aspirations, parent support and identify the real barriers to college attainment for public school students in LAUSD.

Building Successful Students: Creating Disciplinary Policies that Promote College.

A Plan for Improving Roosevelt High School
By United Students | January 2003

In the spring of 2002, InnerCity Struggle student leaders from United Students began a research process to identify the main problems at Roosevelt High School. Student leaders collected more than 754 surveys, including questions on the effectiveness of the tardy room, culturally relevant curriculum, and access and support for college course requirements. In this report, United Students present their findings for alternative policies to the tardy room.

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